Your Rottweiler’s Coat: 8 Ways To Take Care Of It


two Rottweilers

Even though Rottweilers do not have long and silky coats like Spaniels or Afghan Hounds, their coats are pretty thick, and some maintenance is required in order to keep them in tip-top shape.

According to accepted norms, Rottweilers have a double coat of fur, not hair, but there is actually no fundamental difference. Here’s how you can keep your Rottweiler’s double coat healthy:

  1. Brushing
  2. Bathing
  3. Keeping it dry
  4. Good diet
  5. Good exercise
  6. Ensure well-being
  7. Parasite prevention
  8. Cleaning eyes

This article looks at ways to maintain a healthy Rottweiler coat but also provides information about the Rottweiler’s coat itself.

Do Rottweilers Have Hair Or Fur?

There is no fundamental difference between hair and fur. Both are strands of keratin; they are just specialized or adapted for a specific purpose.

Hair is keratin strands adapted to the needs of humans, and fur is keratin strands adapted to the needs of animals. Typically, hair is thinner and lighter, while fur is denser.

Some animals’ coats are referred to as hair because they more closely resemble human hair than the fur of other animals. For example, Yorkshire Terriers are said to have hair.

It is not incorrect to say that a Rottweiler has hair because hair is a collection of keratin strands, and that’s what makes up a Rottweiler’s coat.

However, the term fur is more applicable for Rottweilers based on the accepted norms.

Is A Rottweiler A Double Coated Dog?

Rottweilers, like many other dog breeds, have two coats.

The Rottweiler’s outer coat is of medium length and is straight, sitting flat against the dog’s body. Texturally, it is quite a coarse coat, and it is also dense.

The Rottweiler’s undercoat is shorter than the outer coat, but it is also quite dense, adding to the overall thickness of a Rottie’s fur.

The undercoat of a Rottweiler changes seasonally.

Do Rottweilers Shed A Lot?

Rottweilers are considered moderate shedders for most of the year.

However, twice each year, they experience something known as coat blowing. This is the process whereby the dog’s entire undercoat is replaced within a short space of time.

Related: Do Rottweilers Shed a Lot? Sometimes, and Here’s Why!

This happens seasonally. In the warmer months, the thicker undercoat is shed and replaced with a thinner coat. Then in the colder months, this lighter undercoat is replaced with a thicker one.

During these times, your house may be overrun with Rottweiler fur if you do not maintain a rigid brushing regimen.

How To Maintain A Rottweiler’s Coat

Rottweilers are considered to have low to moderate grooming requirements.

This means that you won’t be spending most of your life grooming your dog, and if you miss a grooming session every now and then, it is not the end of the world.  

Still, you want to make sure your Rottweiler’s coat is as healthy as possible.

1. Maintain A Healthy Coat By Brushing Your Rottweiler

During the year, when your Rottweiler is shedding normally, you should brush them once or twice a week.

During the coat blowing, you will probably have to brush them every day just to stop your house looking like it’s been hit by a fur-storm.

Brushing doesn’t just remove loose fur; it also helps spread natural oils over the entire coat.

Curry brushes are great for a Rottweiler’s dense and coarse coat. The rubber bristles or teeth of these brushes pull loose fur away from the body without ripping out the fixed strands.

The Bohdi Dog Bath Brush is our pick for best brush of 2021. We love that it doesn’t pull on hair, which makes it a great brush for sensitive skin.

Alternatively, you could try some rubber grooming gloves. These are excellent if your dog doesn’t like the brush.

For this, we recommend the Bissell De-Shedding Grooming Gloves. The five finger design on these is useful for getting at hard to reach places.

For your Rottweiler’s undercoat, the general consensus (and we completely agree) is that the FURminator Undercoat Deshedding Tool For Dogs is the best out there. Check it out for yourself – we’re sure that you’ll agree!

2. Maintain A Healthy Coat By Bathing Your Rottweiler

You should not be bathing your Rottweiler too often, but every few months with the occasional extra if they have rolled in something nasty.

The first rule about bathing your Rottweiler is you should not use human shampoo, not even if it is gentle, baby shampoo.

Whatever shampoo you choose, make sure you rinse it all off. Additionally, watch closely to make sure your Rottweiler is not having a reaction to the shampoo if it is the first time you are using it.

One great option is Pro Pet Works All Natural Organic Dog Shampoo, which is designed to be gentle. This product keeps your Rottie’s sensitive skin in mind.

3. Maintain A Healthy Coat By Keeping Your Rottweiler Dry

The double coat of your Rottweiler is dense and can trap water. If you have a swimming Rottweiler, or your Rottweiler has just been caught in the rain, make sure they are completely dried.

A damp dog is a smelly dog and a breeding ground for bacteria. If your Rottweilers is happy with a hairdryer, then use it at its coolest setting, and don’t bring the nose too near your dog’s skin.

Otherwise, a good rub down with a towel should do the trick and get most of the moisture out of your Rottweiler’s coat.

4. Maintain A Healthy Coat With A Good Diet

A healthy diet is vital to a healthy coat. Your Rottweiler’s food should be well-balanced and contain all the nutrients and oils that their coats need.

It’s best to consult a veterinarian about which food your Rottweiler should be eating, but this is not always possible.

In our opinion, Royal Canin makes a great product. The link below is for Royal Canin puppy food, but they produce quality food for all stages of your Rottweiler’s life.

Also, talk to your veterinarian about a good Omega-3 supplement.

5. Maintain A Healthy Coat With Sufficient Exercise

Running Rottweiler

Just as a healthy diet helps to maintain a beautiful, shiny coat, so too does exercise because it keeps your Rottweiler fit and healthy.

6. Maintain A Healthy Coat Healthy By Keeping Your Rottweiler Happy

When a dog is unhappy or anxious, one of the signs indicating this is a dull coat or abnormal shedding.

Ensure that you Rottweiler has sufficient environmental enrichment, plenty of time with you and the family, and is not left alone too often.

7. Maintain A Healthy Coat By Protecting Your Rottweiler From Parasites

Fleas, ticks, and mites are all parasites that can affect the health of your dog’s coat. These creatures irritate and damage the skin, which affects the condition of the coat.

Additionally, fleas and mites poop in your dog’s fur, and these particles can accumulate and stick together, causing matting.

A good flea and tick collar is essential, and our pick for the best flea and tick collar for 2021 is the SOBAKEN Flea And Tick Collar. We love that this collar is waterproof, and you only need to replace it every 8 months.

8. Maintain A Healthy Coat By Keeping Your Rottweiler’s Eyes Clean

If your Rottweiler gets the occasional eye booger, then you need to clean it off immediately. They can cause matting of the face fur, sores, and infections if left under the eyes for too long.

If your Rottweiler struggles with eye boogers, then take them to see a veterinarian as there may be a health issue.

Be sure to check out the video below, as it goes in depth with all you need to know about Rottweiler grooming and coat care!

Final Thoughts

Taking care of your Rottweiler’s coat is not a difficult task. They shed, but that’s about it. They aren’t prone to tangles, oil build-up, etc.

Brushing your Rottweiler a few days a week, giving them an occasional bath, keeping their eyes free from muck, and preventing parasites is all you need to do externally.

There are also some internal aspects to maintaining a healthy coat. A well-balanced diet, sufficient exercise, and ensuring that your Rottweiler is happy and content will produce a beautiful and shiny coat on your friend.

Hunter Reed

I've owned and trained German Shepherds and a variety of other large and medium breed dogs for over 20 years now - Labradors, Rottweilers, Dobermans, Pit Bull Terriers - just to name a few. Myself, along with my team of highly experienced canine professionals, strive to bring you the best and most useful information to help you raise your dog the right way. Read my story here.

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